Academic Leigh Speaking

A professor, four kids, and a crash course in work/life balance

Day Trip to Montgomery August 2, 2017

Tuesday we took a day trip to Montgomery (about 1.5 hours southeast of Birmingham). As we drove, we could tell it was getting more southern, and we were enjoying the scenery, and feeling super-lucky that we hit Alabama in early August at dry, cooler than usual temperatures!

Our plan was in flux (when isn’t it!?) and so we did the Rosa Parks Museum first. It was fascinating! Harlan had a hard time with the video at the beginning, so I took him out. Then I went back in when the group had moved on, and I got to read the stuff in that room. A few things I learned: the bus boycott was sort of a test case for non-violent activism and pressure, Black travelers had a green book that would tell them where they’d be allowed to buy gas, and get a bite to eat (I was horrified thinking of traveling with a family and not knowing if you’d be able to buy gas), and white insurance companies retaliated against the bus boycotters by changing insurance policies on cars to prevent carpooling and church shuttle wagons. The museum sits on the place where Rosa Parks was arrested.

Porter stands with the statue of Rosa Parks.

We spent an hour at the museum and it went by really quickly. Then, we tried to visit the Dexter Ave Parsonage Museum where Martin Luther King, Jr. lived while the Montgomery bus boycott was happening. One thing we discovered in Montgomery is that most places are actual tours to lead you through a place. I like that and I think that we learn more with a guide, but Harlan is so difficult to manage in enclosed spaces that it sometimes isn’t feasible for us. Instead of doing the tour, we visited the meditation garden and had a snack. Then we were kind of at loose ends, as the other places we’d thought to go weren’t open yet.

Patrick said, “Well, what about the Capitol building.” That seemed like a good idea, and it was close by. We went there and discovered the Dexter Ave King Memorial Church. That was our first amazing find of the day. We walked in, and there was already a tour going, so we couldn’t join in, but a wonderful woman took us all over the downstairs of the church, and invited the boys to sit at Dr. King’s desk, look at his phone and typewriter, and then she took us up to the sanctuary where he gave sermons from 1954-1960. She said the organist at the church today is the same organist from the 1950s! We enjoyed this experience so much, and this is what a personable tour guide can do. She also felt mission to spread the message and love, I believe.

They think they might be the only one’s at school who’ve sat at Dr. King’s desk!

After saving our trip to Montgomery, we walked up to the Capitol. It was interesting, but mostly because the statue in front of the building is a statue of Jefferson Davis. Yet, this is also where MLK gave his “How Long, Not Long” speech after the march from Selma to Montgomery. We talked a little with the kids about why people think these statues should be removed. They agreed and thought a statue to MLK out to replace Davis. We wandered all around the grounds, enjoying finding state flags, looking at a lollypine tree grown from seeds taken to the moon, and viewed from afar the first White House of the Confederacy. Not all the statues are confederates! A pioneer in Gynecology was honored too, and the boys got a big kick out of that.

Alabama Capitol

On this trip, I’ve been to the capital of West Virginia, Kentucky, Tennessee, and Alabama. Before we’re done, we’ll also be in the capital of North Carolina and Virginia!

One thing that I think the older boys are starting to understand that racism may not look the same today, but it still exists and we are responsible for helping to make sure that people aren’t treated unfairly because of who they are. We’ve tried to create teachable moments on this trip, but man, they often pop up out of the kids mouths! I think it’s been confusing for Seamus when he should use different words, especially since the museums use different words to denote different time periods (colored for Jim Crow era segregation, Negro baseball leagues, Black or African American for current day, etc).

After touring downtown, we headed out of town for our picnic at Fort Tolouse-Jackson State Historic Park.

1000 year old Mississippian Mounds

The fort was a fascinating palimpsest of cultures. In a not very long walk, you could see the ancient Mississippian mound (which impressed Patrick and me far more than it did the boys), a reconstructed French Fort Tolouse used to fend off British and Spanish armies in the mid-1700s, the ruins of the American Fort Jackson built for the War of 1812 and to defend against the French and Creek Indians until 1836.

Fort Tolouse

Creek winter and summer dwellings. Alabama is named after the Alabama tribe, part of the Creek confederacy.

Seamus studied American Indian dwellings this year in school, so I asked him if these were similar to those he’d studied. He said no, and I asked him why he thought they weren’t. He did a decent job thinking about how the landscape and customs of different tribes affected how they lived. Gilbert then asked if Creeks still lived in these houses? I asked him, “Do you still live in a fort?” And he got it! Yay!

It was an incredibly busy and fun day. We drove back to Birmingham via the scenic route, passing through the Talladega national forest. Beautiful!

For a treat we stopped at Steel City Pops for a popsicle. I read about the store in 3 days with kids in Birmingham post, and it was definitely special enough to make it an event in itself. Seamus got lavender lemonade and has been talking about it ever since. He is the most adventurous in an ice cream store.

Sweet end to the day!

We came back for a swim and dinner, then bed. They hit the sack with few complaints, thank goodness.

 

Life with a 2 year old  May 2, 2017

Filed under: Family Life,Food,Third Baby — leighj @ 4:45 pm

Porter: I would like a quesadilla. 

Me: You’re having noodles for dinner. (having made neither) 

Porter: I really like a quesadilla please. 

Me: Ok. 

Porter: I like it cold. 

Me: Well, I have to hear it up to melt the cheese. 

Porter: I don’t LIKE cheese. 

Me: That’s what a quesadilla is. 

Porter: No. 

five minutes later 

Porter: Nice quesadilla Mama. Thank you. 

(So easily and 50% chance of going the other way!)

 

Decompression April 17, 2017

Filed under: Food,Friends and Relatives,Travel — leighj @ 8:00 am

We drove out to the country on Saturday where we visited with Patrick’s aunt and uncle. It was so nice of them to host us. His aunt had prepped an Easter Egg hunt for the kids, which they loved (and I loved because it was orderly!). We had a lunch of Mexican food with platanos, excellent mole, and a funny dish called huraches. We had resisted eating Mexican in the city so we’d be in the mood for it, and boy Howdy! we were so happy. Porter put away a lot of rice!

Then we spent time playing with the dogs, working in the garden, and trying to stump each other and Alexa the smart device with riddles.

Harlan Loves the Doggie (except he kept saying Kiki).

It’s funny with kids and dogs. I think each of them has gone through a phase of being afraid of dogs, no matter the size or personality of the dog. Even today, Seamus is still skittish around dogs, but Gilbert loves them. Not to be outdone, Seamus insisted on a turn walking the dogs this time. And the boys wanted to go out and throw a ball for them. Harlan, though, was hilarious. He LOVED the dogs. He laughed when they licked him, clapped when they came near, and took off with no thought for the hard rocks when they came near enough to pet. He pitched a (very rare) tantrum when he saw them outside without him. He wanted to go play! Porter was a little reserved, but he came around as long at the dog didn’t steal his bouncing chicken. These really are the sweetest, fluffiest, friendliest little dogs!

For dinner, we had quite a treat! We went out with Patrick’s aunt and uncle to a pizza place (The Parlor) where the atmosphere was hip, the service was friendly, and the food was beyond amazing. I had a special English Pea pizza with fontina, peas, and something else that I missed in the description, but unlike the pizzas I had in Romania, where they would dump a can of peas, corn, and carrots on the pizza and call it vegetarian, this pizza was memorable in a good way.

Seamus got his heart set on the Razor Clam special, which was met with general incredulity from the staff. And, if I’m being honest, me too. I tried to talk him out of ordering it, but he seemed so dejected when I questioned his choice, I quickly walked back. He got a lot of attention as he put each one but the last away.

He says, “Why do pictures of me always look weird?” “Because I tell you to smile, and this is the face you make instead.”

So Seamus ate his food well. Gilbert ordered Chicken and Waffles, against my better judgement. I told him on Wednesday I’d be ordering for him the rest of the trip, since he ordered something and didn’t eat it. I had done pretty well with that plan, but I was feeling relaxed and hopeful that he’d eat it all. He ate all the waffles! But, I still win. He ate the chicken for lunch the next day. Everyone is happy.

This is the face of a boy who is planning to only eat the waffles…little does he know.

We were so happy to see family and get in a visit, even if it was super quick. We are grateful for people who enjoy spending time with our kids, who have fun, creative ideas,  and who know the places to find the most delicious food in Westchester county.

 

Clean Spaces January 11, 2017

I cleaned my office on Friday last week, and we’ve been keeping the house a bit neater (when possible–the kids are pretty good at messifying it). It is nice to have some open space–makes it easier to think. However, I find that I’m not quite ready for work as I’m now wandering about wondering what I should do.

A long time ago, I wrote about using KonMari methods to tidy our space. We didn’t do full bore tidying, but we did a lot of work around the house, especially with regard to clothes, papers, toys, and books. I am pleased with our efforts on nights like last night when cleaning the house up just meant returning everything to the bins they had been in! Last night, Gilbert was the biggest helper in cleaning up the common space. I think it was because he and I had been silly instead of antagonistic earlier in the evening. (It involved singing Andrea Bocelli’s (Time to Say Goodbye) with the words, “Gilbert doesn’t want to get dressed but if he doesn’t it will be “Time to GO TO TIME OUT” sit in the kitchen for hours, now he’ll go brush his teeth, get all clean, comb his hair… etc.) Pretty hilarious, except Porter got upset and wanted Gilbert to actually go to time out.

And, per the new recommendations, we gave Harlan some peanut butter. I want to say that nothing happened, but that would be untrue. He grinned, and clapped, and squealed, and demanded more peanut butter! It is the best thing he has ever tasted! (Friends with a young baby were laughing with us that it’s funny with babies because this is the first time in their lives that they have ever tasted a food, so it’s novel and exciting–I’m not describing the feeling well.)

Ok, the most fun thing that happened recently was snow:

Porter's snow bibs!

Porter’s snow bibs!

Harlan practices standing without holding on!

Harlan practices standing without holding on!

 

CSA Gleaning and Roundup October 24, 2016

This weekend, we went out to the farm for the last CSA event.

Digging Sweet Potatoes

Digging Sweet Potatoes

The farmer is very enthusiastic and took us down to the sweet potatoes right away. Gilbert really got into the digging, and we quickly had a lot. Then we saw a black widow in a deer bone, heard some stories about copperheads and rattlesnakes, and we walked back up. We wanted to make apple cider, get some eggs, and get hot peppers for pickling. We ended up meeting all those goals.

Highlights:

  • The interaction with the farmer!
  • Using the cider press. We also picked up apples from the ground to send through the cider press. Seamus and Gilbert were slow and picky during this task, so I told them that we were only pressing the apples they collected. That didn’t make them work more efficiently, but they did regret it later when they tasted their delicious cider and knew if they’d only worked a bit harder, they would have had more.
  • We had a bang up time picking hot peppers. We have three jars put in the fridge now, which should last us a while. They are so delicious (and pretty spicy!). Gilbert and Porter liked picking them. Porter tends to tag along into the weeds, and then get stuck.
  • We saw how okra grows (both S & G want an okra patch next year). We got a couple of pumpkins, some bell peppers, lettuce, sorrel, and parsley. Yesterday, I made a cream of sorrel and parsley soup, which went very well with the apple crisp. I’d been getting tired of the greens we were getting in the CSA, but when we went out and picked a mess of them ourselves and then cooked them right up, I wasn’t sick of them anymore!
  • Seamus kept nibbling on the lettuce in the garden.
  • Gilbert exclaimed, “This is like OCR!” That means outdoor classroom at his school. Later I asked him if he acts like he did at the farm in OCR, right up on the farmer and digging in the dirt. Gilbert said, of course, nobody else wants to get all dirty and be the example. I thought, how amazing! So many kids don’t know what the plants look like that produce their food.
  • At one point, we laughed and said, “Who would go to Cox farms [a fancy pumpkin patch] when you could do this!?” It was cold and windy, but warm in the sun. We all found something to make the day exciting. Even Harlan was awake the whole time. On the way home, we had three sleeping kids.

Now we have a little more bounty to cook up and use. However, one thing that will be easier now is menu planning. I’m looking forward to getting back to the routine with that. We are having apples come out of our ears–but I’m not complaining!

 

Filling our Days with Food Processing August 10, 2016

Filed under: Family Life,Food,Summer Vacation — leighj @ 8:49 pm
Tags:

We continue to get a bountiful harvest from Farmer Leigh (not me). We leave again for vacation on Friday (I know, you probably hate me for my tough life), but we’re trying to process all the food we have before we leave. I’ve ventured into pickle making. Part of the trouble is that it’s so hot, we don’t really want to eat cooked food. So I have to find a way to use veggies that we’ll only eat about half of at the moment.

Pickles: Seamus helped me make pickles–8 pint jars so far. He was interested in stirring in the salt and mixing the right proportion of vinegar and water. He also kept very good track of the time we put them in the refrigerator so as know when 48 hours had elapsed and we could try them. I thanked him for being a big help, and said, “I like doing projects with you.” While we were working in the kitchen, Porter and Harlan were sleeping, and Gilbert and Patrick were outside working on the Vespa. Seamus said, “Dada likes working on projects with Gilbert.” It’s true, but he also likes working with Seamus, but Seamus is so often uninterested in the outdoor, mechanical project. I was surprised he would help with the pickles, but he was more interested when I deputized him to mixing and stirring all on his own. They tasted the pickles today and Gilbert loved them. Seamus liked it because he made it, but he wanted to rinse the dill off.

Zucchini Bread–Boring and self-explanatory. We have a boatload of summer squash. I’ve made 8 loaves of zucchini bread, a pasta bake for the freezer, a roasted veggie lasagne, and a squash/quiche bake, and I still have three in the fridge…

Tomatillos–Patrick and I have made two separate batches of salsa verde. He grilled his and I roasted mine, so we’ll see how they stack up.

Basil–We’ve eaten and frozen a ton of pesto.

Tomatoes–Hmmm…well, we never seem to have too many of these. Caprese, salsa, marinara, sandwiches, salads, we just eat them. Now if the darn squirrels would quit eating mine in the garden! Porter is a tomato boy. He had a serving of cherry tomatoes for lunch, and that was about it.

Ground Cherries–I thought we might get enough of these to freeze or something, but Seamus and Gilbert eat them right off the plants as fast as they will ripen!

Plants–Our CSA gives us two plants every week. I’ve been trying to get them in the ground, but it’s difficult when I’m totally out of space! Patrick and S & G got me a new planter and soil to plant them in today, so now I have sage, parsley, and stevia in the planter. I’m looking forward to the sage with butternut squash!

And there’s more. Before we leave on Friday, we have to figure out the green cabbage, the sorrel, the kohlrabi, the last three squash, and about 35 potatoes. But I guess it’s a good problem to have.

 

CSA–What we’ve gotten and what we’ve made. June 23, 2016

Filed under: Food,Uncategorized — leighj @ 12:48 pm
Tags: , ,

Our CSA is going gang busters, and our garden is coming along. Some of this is notes for me for the future, but if you have questions or want one of the recipes, shoot me a line.

What we’ve gotten so far:

  1. Garlic Scapes (loads)
  2. Mustard greens
  3. Boc Choi
  4. Cauliflower
  5. Kale
  6. Sorrel
  7. Lettuce
  8. Herb plants–Basil, lemon balm, and Greek basil
  9. Broccoli
  10. Cilantro
  11. Fennel
  12. Kohlrabi
  13. Eggs
  14. A few other things

What we’ve made:

  • Saag Paneer (with mustard greens) and Masala Gobi (cauliflower)
  • Loads of crispy kale
  • Kale smoothies
  • Boc Choi with udon and boc choi stirfry
  • Spanakopita with Kale and Fennel
  • Kohlrabi fritters
  • Salsa
  • Greek Cauliflower with Rosemary and tomatoes (rosemary from the garden!)
  • Lots of basil pesto from the garden (my basil might be overwatered…I hope it lives)
  • Roasted broccoli
  • A cauliflower pasta sauce (I froze this for making pasta bakes in the future)
  • Lots of salad

I’m still working on the other greens. I’m thinking greens fritters or a greens pie in the New Vegetarian Epicure. A reason this thing is working is that we can collect the veggies on Monday night, process some after the kids go to bed, and then we spend a lot of time on Tuesday and Wednesday processing veggies. I’m hoping once we get more stuff that aren’t greens, it won’t be quite so labor intensive. We ordered a double share, and we are getting a LOT of food.

Our CSA is Bull Run Mountain Farm, if you want to check it out.