Literary Criticism Existential Crisis

I am so close to being done with this chapter, but it still seems like it is taking forever. This is probably because I know I’m going to have a lot more work to do even after this chapter is finished. Writing the bulk of a dissertation in a year has been a challenge, but I guess it’s been doable. Mostly because my advisor is so supportive, Patrick believes that I can finish this project and takes Seamus out to do stuff so I can work, my parents always ask about the progress, and my friends are willing to read drafts or listen to half-baked ideas, I have been able to make this kind of progress. It’s great to have a support system, especially when I reach the point of wondering what the heck I’m writing about and why anyone would care about it–much less publish and read it? I think the literary criticism existential crisis much reach up and bite everyone from time to time–please tell me I’m not the only one…but it’s worse when Stanley Fish goes to writing about it in the New York Times.

I’m organizing an alumni mixer for New Mexico Lewis & Clark grads. It’s going to be super cool, especially since LC is going to buy the first round! Speaking of rounds, we’re really trying to fill up our pint glass promotion card so we can get a glass with the second baby’s name on it. Anybody in town want to drink some pints? For me. Because I can’t right now.

36 weeks today! One more week to full term and then the waiting begins. (As if we weren’t counting down already…)

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1 comment

  1. I have the same existential crisis all the time. Then I taught a class last fall on the topic of my dissertation (trauma & mourning) and, after the class, a student emailed me that her fiance had been killed in a car accident and she found that having studied how literature portrayed trauma and mourning allowed her to better understand what she was going through and work through it. Now, I hope none of my students ever have to use my class for that purpose again, but it made me feel slightly more…purposeful.

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